NOTEBOOK FEATURE

StuartDybekFEATURE

Contest Announcement: American Short(er) Fiction Prize

We are thrilled to announce that Stuart Dybek will be judging this year’s American Short(er) Fiction Prize. The prize recognizes extraordinary short fiction under 1,000 words. The first-place winner will receive a $500 prize and publication, and the second-place winner will receive $250 and publication. All entries will be considered for publication. Previous winners of the Short(er) Fiction Prize have gone on to be anthologized in places such as The Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses. General Guidelines after the jump. [...]

StuartDybekFEATURE

Contest Announcement: American Short(er) Fiction Prize

We are thrilled to announce that Stuart Dybek will be judging this year’s American Short(er) Fiction Prize. The prize recognizes extraordinary short fiction under 1,000 words. The first-place winner will receive a $500 prize and publication, and the second-place winner will receive $250 and publication. All entries will be considered for publication. Previous winners of the Short(er) Fiction Prize have gone on to be anthologized in places such as The Pushcart Prize: Best of the Small Presses. General Guidelines after the jump. [...]

NullGordonSQUARE

Jaimy Gordon Interviews Matthew Neill Null

“The Slow Lean of Time,” Matthew Neill Null’s sweeping account of the hazardous lives of the 19th Century drovers who steered giant logs down West Virginia’s rivers, contains what might be the most genuinely shocking moment of any short story I’ve read this year. This despite the fact that Null, whose story we were pleased to publish in Issue 57 of American Short Fiction, describes the world his characters inhabit from such a high vantage point that we see them as smallish players moving across an expansive historical landscape. [...]

CMBarnes_AuthorPhoto_SQUARE

Online Fiction Interview: C.M. Barnes

This month, I want to preface our online exclusive interview with an anecdote. In my first semester of graduate school, I taught an introductory creative writing class in which I received four—four!—stories that were about a dying or recently deceased grandmother. My first thought: why no dead grandfathers? My second thought: along with stories about car crashes and college keg parties, I must ban stories about dead or dying grandmothers in future classes, and that’s just what I did. [...]

Remember-Me-Like-ThisSQUARE-150x150

An Interview with Bret Anthony Johnston

Bret Anthony Johnston has the distinction of being among the few writers occupying that slim but coveted slice of the Venn diagram: creative writing directors who have also been pro skateboarders. His latest work, Remember Me Like This, is a quiet and rich novel centered around a teenage boy named Justin who is returned to his family four years after his kidnapping. [...]

ASF READS