NOTEBOOK FEATURE

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Online Fiction Interview: Sarah Gerkensmeyer

Sarah Gerkensmeyer’s “Ramona,” our online exclusive for April, is nearly a contradiction in terms. It’s at once a tender-hearted, naturalistic reflection on adolescence and faded friendship and an utterly non-naturalistic look at the limits of embodiment. In this interview, we asked Gerkensmeyer about bending the rules of nature in fiction and, in the process, we learned a bit more about how she approaches a draft, a story, a novel, and key metaphors that are—at times—seemingly incidental to the writing process itself. We emailed with Gerkensmeyer from her home in Fredonia, New York, where she lives with her family and teaches writing at SUNY Fredonia. Her story collection, What You Are Now Enjoying, was selected by Stewart O’Nan as winner of the Autumn House Press Fiction Prize and longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award.

Gerkensmeyer_ORIGINAL full size

Online Fiction Interview: Sarah Gerkensmeyer

Sarah Gerkensmeyer’s “Ramona,” our online exclusive for April, is nearly a contradiction in terms. It’s at once a tender-hearted, naturalistic reflection on adolescence and faded friendship and an utterly non-naturalistic look at the limits of embodiment. In this interview, we asked Gerkensmeyer about bending the rules of nature in fiction and, in the process, we learned a bit more about how she approaches a draft, a story, a novel, and key metaphors that are—at times—seemingly incidental to the writing process itself. We emailed with Gerkensmeyer from her home in Fredonia, New York, where she lives with her family and teaches writing at SUNY Fredonia. Her story collection, What You Are Now Enjoying, was selected by Stewart O’Nan as winner of the Autumn House Press Fiction Prize and longlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award.

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If You Lived Here: An Interview with Jennine Capó Crucet

The second interview in the “If You Lived Here” blog series is with Jennine Capó Crucet, author of the short fiction collection How to Leave Hialeah, which won the Iowa Short Fiction Award. How to Leave Hialeah is a beautiful and detailed map of the crowded beaches and neighborhoods of Miami as seen through the lives of the people who call them home. Her new novel, Magic City Relic, is forthcoming for St. Martin’s Press in 2015.

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Karen Russell Donates Her Sleep

Amidst a busy semester teaching at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, literary wunderkind Karen Russell talks to Vincent Scarpa about the inspiration of strange constraints, how a novella might work like a Florida thundershower, and her new ebook, Sleep Donation, out now from Atavist Books.

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Short Story Contest Open for Submissions

We are excited to announce that the ASF Short Story Contest opened for submissions on February 26th. This year we are honored to have Amy Hempel as our guest judge. Submissions will be accepted through the end of May. The 1st place winner will receive a $1,000 prize and publication in our Fall issue. One runner-up will receive $500 and all entries will be considered for publication. [...]

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