Web Exclusive Interview: Suzanne Morrison

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In our April Web Exclusive story, “The Mother’s Portion,” a woman with a husband and six children goes to extreme measures to reclaim herself. It’s a surprising story; it makes triumphant that which we think of as affliction. We talked with author Suzanne Morrison about liberation, our mutual love of Maggie Nelson, and the importance of telling our survival stories. […]

The Hungry Valley

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Now he fed his horses too much rich corn sweetened with molasses: their middles were round and taut as barrels, and their hooves curled, and instead of nipping and tossing about like they had in the past, they loitered at the gate all day, calling out to him whenever he passed. His old dog he fed too much kibble and too many table scraps: its back was strangely broad and thin of hair like a threadbare piece of overstuffed furniture, and it could no longer move quickly nor jump with ease. The cats lapped milk from pie tins on the barn floor […]

Announcing Our American Short Fiction Contest Winners!

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We are so pleased to announce that Elizabeth McCracken has chosen the winners of our 2015 American Short Fiction Contest. The first place prize goes to Leona Theis, for her story “How Sylvie Failed to Become a Better Person Through Yoga.” The second place prize goes to CJ Hauser for her story “Gala 4135.” […]

ASF Alumni: Jean Thompson

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Since Jean Thompson was first published in American Short Fiction in the Winter 1993 issue, her short story collection Who Do You Love was nominated for The National Book Award, and in 2002, her novel, Wide Blue Yonder), was named a New York Times Notable Book and Chicago Tribune Best Fiction selection. Her newest novel, The Humanity Project (Blue Rider Press, March 2013) […]

Online Fiction: Interview with Anthony Abboreno

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Mary Miller interviews Anthony Abboreno, the author of “Filler,” the first fiction post on our website in over a year. Abboreno’s story is about the complicated relationship between children and their parents’ expectations. There are lobsters with personalities, an ex-wife who loves New Year’s Eve, and a man who tries to do his best, but falls short. “Filler” covers a lot of territory in few words.

Things American: From Post-Black to Postmortem–The Tragic Death of Trayvon Martin

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Trayvon Martin’s death and George Zimmerman’s acquittal are further proof that Obama’s two-term presidency and the spike in interracial marriage have not magically transformed America into some post-racial Shangri-la free of the demons of prejudice and discrimination. The country is post-black, as cultural critic Touré demonstrates in his book Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? Blacks, he […]

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